Mid North Coast Pioneers - Newcastle to Lismore and beyond

Convict uniform as punishment

Thomas HALLAge: 3817831821

Name
Thomas HALL
Given names
Thomas
Surname
HALL
Birth about 1783
Religious marriageSarah BROOKESView this family
March 2, 1805 (Age 22)
Address: Plumstead St. Nicholas Borough
Citation details: 13 February 2012
Text:

In part:

"The marriage Banns of Thomas & Sarah show they were married on the 2nd March 1805, I know some people have the 3rd Feb'. I can send you a copy if you want it."

Hall - Thomas and Brooks - Sarah
Hall - Thomas and Brooks - Sarah

Note: Image kindly provided by Barry Sylvester.

Birth of a daughter
#1
Harriet HALL
calculated 1814 (Age 31)
Silvester - Harriet
Silvester - Harriet

Note: Image kindly made available by the volunteers at Australian Cemeteries Index.

Citation details: 11 February 2012
Text:

In part:

"In 2008 I discovered the baptism record for Harriet my GG grandmother , she was born in 1814 Woolwich Kent the very place her mother was born. In 1821 June, she was 6 yrs old when she entered the Orphanage in Sydney. This means she already had her sixth birthday which means she had to be born late 1814 or early 1815. The Mary Ann never left England until august 1815 at the very latest if she was born at sea she would have be born in the November of 1815, is,ply because when Thomas Hall [her father], was convicted in March 1815 he and his brother William were locked up aboard prison Hulk ships. Everyone including people who did do a lot of research on our family is convinced it is our Harriet."

Note: The headstone for Harriet is inscribed that she was 66 years of age at the time of her death in 1880.
Convicted
Sentenced to transportation for life
1815 (Age 32)
Publication: Lesley Uebel, 2001, CD
Citation details: Convict Names page 1123.
Convict
Arrived on board the "Ocean I"
January 30, 1816 (Age 33)
Publication: Lesley Uebel, 2001, CD
Citation details: Convict Names, page 1123.
Death May 1821 (Age 38)
Cause of death: Presumed by drowning
Text:

Thomas Hall presumably drowned in May 1821 as explained in the article in the Sydney Gazette of 19-5-1821.

"We are sorry to have to report a calamity which involves circumstances of a truly distressing nature. A man, named Thomas Hall, who has been for some time past in the habit of supporting his family by cutting wood and burning lime in the various coves, and has lately been at work in Middle Harbour with three other men, on Friday week dispatched one of the men home, with directions to return to him on the Monday following in the event of his not (by that period) reaching Sydney with the boat. Not returning as expected, the man set out through the woods, and after diligent search and enquiry, saw not the least appearance of the boat. After a lapse of a day or two another boat was dispatched in quest of the absentees. Upon arriving at the place from whence the boat is supposed to have taken her load, there was every appearance of a quantity of lime having been removed; but no traces of the poor men could be ascertained. One oar of the boat, however, has been picked up, with a hat, supposed to have been worn by one of the men. From these circumstances, therefore, there can be no hesitation in pronouncing upon the destiny of three unfortunate fellow-creatures, and declaring that they have met with a watery grave. Providentially, two of the men were without families; but Hall has left a pregnant wife, and five young children, to deplore the loss of a good husband, a kind father and a sober and industrious member of society. We are happy to bear testimony that the Benevolent Society afforded the usual prompt assistance on this melancholy occasion; but, as a burden of such magnitude would be too much for the Society to bear for a continuance, it is desirable that some other means should be devised to enable the widow (a deserving woman) to maintain her little family in honesty. The public has never yet been solicited in vain; and we are pretty well assured, that such a doleful relation as this will lead to increase that susceptibility which is ready to manifest itself at almost every call. A poor woman, far advanced in pregnancy, with five orphans, is now constrained to crave relief from a benevolent Public. With this in view, we are authorised to state, that the Rev. Mr. Cowper, and the Rev. Mr. Hill, will be ready to afford any further information that may be required; and that these worthy Gentlemen also will rejoice much in receiving any pecuniary relief that may be afforded in behalf of such charitable purposes. It is rather remarkable that various trials which this poor family have had to contend with: This is the interesting case stated in the last report of the Benevolent Society:- he had but very few weeks become possessed of the boat as his own property; when, by a severe fall, he fractured his collar-bone, which for a considerable time, prevented his daily labour; and now, by this calamity, all the burden of five little children is suddenly cast upon his widow, who, in a few weeks, as already stated, will have to mourn over a sixth."

Family with Sarah BROOKES - View this family
himself
Convict uniform as punishmentThomas HALL
Birth: about 1783Maresfield, Sussex, England, United Kingdom
Death: May 1821Middle Harbour, , New South Wales, Australia
wife
Marriage: March 2, 1805Plumstead, Kent, England, United Kingdom
10 years
daughter
William JONES + Sarah BROOKES - View this family
wife’s husband
wife
Marriage: about 1822New South Wales, Australia

BirthWeb Site - Hall Family
MarriageEmails - Barry Sylvester
Citation details: 13 February 2012
Text:

In part:

"The marriage Banns of Thomas & Sarah show they were married on the 2nd March 1805, I know some people have the 3rd Feb'. I can send you a copy if you want it."

ConvictedThe Port Jackson Convicts Anthology
Publication: Lesley Uebel, 2001, CD
Citation details: Convict Names page 1123.
ConvictThe Port Jackson Convicts Anthology
Publication: Lesley Uebel, 2001, CD
Citation details: Convict Names, page 1123.
DeathWeb Site - Hall Family
Text:

Thomas Hall presumably drowned in May 1821 as explained in the article in the Sydney Gazette of 19-5-1821.

"We are sorry to have to report a calamity which involves circumstances of a truly distressing nature. A man, named Thomas Hall, who has been for some time past in the habit of supporting his family by cutting wood and burning lime in the various coves, and has lately been at work in Middle Harbour with three other men, on Friday week dispatched one of the men home, with directions to return to him on the Monday following in the event of his not (by that period) reaching Sydney with the boat. Not returning as expected, the man set out through the woods, and after diligent search and enquiry, saw not the least appearance of the boat. After a lapse of a day or two another boat was dispatched in quest of the absentees. Upon arriving at the place from whence the boat is supposed to have taken her load, there was every appearance of a quantity of lime having been removed; but no traces of the poor men could be ascertained. One oar of the boat, however, has been picked up, with a hat, supposed to have been worn by one of the men. From these circumstances, therefore, there can be no hesitation in pronouncing upon the destiny of three unfortunate fellow-creatures, and declaring that they have met with a watery grave. Providentially, two of the men were without families; but Hall has left a pregnant wife, and five young children, to deplore the loss of a good husband, a kind father and a sober and industrious member of society. We are happy to bear testimony that the Benevolent Society afforded the usual prompt assistance on this melancholy occasion; but, as a burden of such magnitude would be too much for the Society to bear for a continuance, it is desirable that some other means should be devised to enable the widow (a deserving woman) to maintain her little family in honesty. The public has never yet been solicited in vain; and we are pretty well assured, that such a doleful relation as this will lead to increase that susceptibility which is ready to manifest itself at almost every call. A poor woman, far advanced in pregnancy, with five orphans, is now constrained to crave relief from a benevolent Public. With this in view, we are authorised to state, that the Rev. Mr. Cowper, and the Rev. Mr. Hill, will be ready to afford any further information that may be required; and that these worthy Gentlemen also will rejoice much in receiving any pecuniary relief that may be afforded in behalf of such charitable purposes. It is rather remarkable that various trials which this poor family have had to contend with: This is the interesting case stated in the last report of the Benevolent Society:- he had but very few weeks become possessed of the boat as his own property; when, by a severe fall, he fractured his collar-bone, which for a considerable time, prevented his daily labour; and now, by this calamity, all the burden of five little children is suddenly cast upon his widow, who, in a few weeks, as already stated, will have to mourn over a sixth."

NoteEmails - Barry Sylvester
Citation details: 13 February 2012