Mid North Coast Pioneers - Newcastle to Lismore and beyond

Convict uniform as punishment

James William THOMPSONAge: 6018061866

Name
James William THOMPSON
Given names
James William
Surname
THOMPSON
Birth 1806

Citation details: 16 November 2010
Thompson - James and Towers - Jane - Permission to marry.
Thompson - James and Towers - Jane - Permission to marry.

Note: Image kindly supplied by Rachael Hirst.

Publication: Lesley Uebel, 2001, CD
Citation details: Convict Names
Convict Record - Thompson - James
Convict Record - Thompson - James

Note: Downloaded from ancestry.com.au.

Birth of a daughter
#1
Unknown THOMPSON
yes

House Breaker
The dwelling house of Samuel Avila
July 30, 1828 (Age 22)
Address: St. Dunstan Stebonheath
Note: Stole three watches at a value of 40 pounds.
Conviction
Of housebreaking and sentenced to death
September 11, 1828 (Age 22)
Address: Third Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Justice Gazelee. Old Bailey
Publication: Lesley Uebel, 2001, CD
Citation details: Convict Names
Note:

Reference Number: t18280911-39 Offence: Theft > housebreaking Verdict: Guilty > with recommendation Punishment: Death Related Material: Associated Records User Wiki: Corrections; Add Information See original

Third Middlesex Jury. - Before Mr. Justice Gazelee.

  1. JAMES THOMPSON was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Samuel Avila , on the 30th of July , at St. Dunstan, Stebonheath, alias Stepney, and stealing therein, 3 watches, value 40l. , his property.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

JAMES LOCKYER . I am apprentice to Mr. Samuel Avila, of Mile-end-road, in the parish of St. Dunstan, Stepney . On the 30th of July I commenced opening the shop at seven o'clock in the morning, precisely, and finished about ten minutes past seven; the shutters lay in the passage, and as I returned from putting the last shutter into the passage, I heard glass break; I walked towards the shop door to open it, and before I got to the door John Hinks kicked at it; in consequence of what he said I went to the shop window, found one pane of glass broken, and the pieces of glass lying down - Hinks gave me a silver watch-case; I examined the window as soon as I got assistance, and put a shutter up to protect it; I then examined, and missed three gold watches - the first was by Ganthony. double bottomed, No. 3412, duplex escapement, half-capped, jewelled in six holes, stops and seconds, going fuzee; another a gold doomed watch by Ganthony, jewelled with rubies, a gold dial, horizontal movement; and another small gold French watch, the dial plate of which had been broken by winding it up with a large key - it was a hunting watch; they were all master's property; I went to Lambeth-street office to Norris almost directly, and took a boy with me - Hinks gave me a description of a person he had seen; I gave that description to the officer, and also a description a boy had given me - I have not seen either of the watches again.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Are you not mistaken in it being the 30th of July? A. No; it was Wednesday morning, the 30th of July; I saw Howard Lewis at Lambeth-street office at the second examination, but had no conversation with him - I have not published any bill, describing the watches; I never described them to Lewis - he was at the office when I gave the particulars; we have an entry of every watch in our books, of the maker's name and number, the day we take them in, and the price lent on them, but not the description - all the rest is from my memory; I examined them several times - we can always tell the description by taking off the cap; I mentioned these particulars in the presence of Lewis at the last examination but one - Mr. Avila was at the last examination, but gave no account of the matter.

JURY. Q. What was the number of the second and third watches? A. I do not know; they had been in the house so long, I did not know how far to turn back.

JOHN HINKS. I am a carman, and live in Mile-end Old-town. On Wednesday, the 30th of July, very near seven o'clock (it might be five or ten minutes after) I saw a person dressed in a short blue jacket, striped waistcoat, blue trousers, and boots under them, run between two trees, and cross the road; in less than three minutes after I heard this window break; when I first saw him he ran from the window between two trees, in a slanting direction, across the road - I did not see his face, adn will not swear that it was the prisoner, but I saw him at Lambeth-street office in a dress similar to that the man wore that morning, and, from that, believe him to be the same man; as soon as I got to Mr. Avila's window there was a silver watch-case lying under the window, and some of the broken glass of the window; I turned to the further door, and kicked with my heel; the apprentice came, and I told him what I had seen; I described the person to him, and said, "There they go;" I pursued him then, but did not succeed in catching him - the prisoner is the person I saw at Lambeth-street, and I believe him to be the man I saw run across the road.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You saw him at the office with the jacket and waistcoat on, and from that you think him the man? A. No, from his stature and appearance.

Q. If you had seen half a dozen men with jackets and waistcoats on, and about the same size, should you be able to pick him out? A. I believe I should.

RICHARD HENRY ASHFORD . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Church-street, Mile-end. I remember the morning of this robbery perfectly well; Cunningham, a customer of mine, came to my shop about eight o'clock that morning - I had some conversation with him about the robbery, and he mentioned the time of the robbery, within a minute or two, and that brought a circumstance to my recollection.

Q. Did you on that morning see the prisoner? A. I did, about ten minutes past seven o'clock; he had a blue jacket, dark trousers and boots, and I knew his face well; I saw him standing looking in at the centre of Mr. Avila's window; the time Cunningham mentioned brought the circumstance to my attention; I turned round to my brother, who was in the shop, and remarked to him what I had seen; Lockyer called on me that morning, and I reported it to him, what I had seen; he gave me a description of the dress - it corresponded precisely with the dress of the prisoner that morning; I am positive the prisoner is the man I saw - I afterwards saw Norris, the officer, and described the same thing to him. I saw the prisoner again in the evening; he was not then dressed as in the morning - I observed that to the officer directly he came; I have known him for several years - it was between seven and eight o'clock when I saw him; he was in company with a young woman; I sent for Norris immediately; he passed our shop, in a direction towards King Edward-street- Norris came to me immediately; I accompanied him to the Halifax Arms, public-house, in King Edward-street, found the prisoner there, and Norris took him.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You have known him seven years? A. Yes; I saw him as near ten minutes after seven o'clock as possible; my shop is about half a mile from Avila's; I was going to my own shop - I had been taking a walk; Avila's shop was open when I passed, the shutters all down, and the shop completely open: I did not hear glass break - I did not see Hinks; the prisoner was looking in at the centre of the window.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. You could not say how long the shop had been opened? A. No; there was nobody at the window but the prisoner - other people were walking about.

JOHN NORRIS . I am an officer of Lambeth-street. On the 30th of July, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, Lockyer gave me information of this robbery - he described the property to me, and the dress of the person who had been seen about; I heard Mr. Ashford could give some information, and went to him; he described the prisoner to me, and mentioned his name - that was about the middle of the day; he sent for me in the evening - I accompanied him to the Halifax Arms public-house, King Edward-street, where we found the prisoner; I took him into custody, searched him, and found a 5l. note, eight sovereigns, two half-sovereigns, and some silver on him - I produce the 5l. note - it is endorsed "A. Levy, Pell-street," and in front is written "H. Lewis, No. 4, Cable-street;" it is now exactly in the same state as when I found it on him - I told him I took him on a charge of felony, and at the watch-house asked him about the note; he told me it was paid to him by the captain of a vessel who he had been out to sea with; in the month of June, 1827, when he came home.

Q. Do you mean that he had received it in 1827, or that he had been to sea in 1827? A. He said he had been home about thirteen months, and at the time he came home he received the note; I looked at the note, and found it dated the 31st of January, 1828; he denied all knowledge of the robbery; I asked how he became possessed of the money - he said he saved it up to buy a hawker's licence. In consequence of information I went on the 4th of August to the premises of Levy, who then lived in Ship-alley; I knew he had before that lived at the corner of Pell-street; I only knew one Levy in Pell-street - I went to his house, to search for the watches; I did not find them - he was not at home; he came to me next morning at the office, and I showed him the note; I went on Wednesday, the 6th, to Lewis' house, in Cable-street - he was not at home, but came to the office to me, in consequence of my leaving a message for him; I told him my business, and he gave me a description of some property, which corresponded exactly with the description Lockyer had given me - I showed Lewis the note.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Are you sure what he said applied to that identical note, or that he had received a 5l. note? A. My question was "Where did you get this 5l. note?" I took the note out of his pocket at the time. I have known Lewis about two years; as long as I have been in office; I do not know his writing - the note was not out of my sight when I showed it to him; he did not write on it in my presence.

HOWARD LEWIS . I am a clothes salesman, and live at No. 4, Cable-street, Wellclose-square. The prisoner came to my shop on the 30th of July, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, and said he wanted to purchase some clothes, that he was going to sea; he selected clothes which came to 4l. 15s.; he pulled a gold watch out of his fob, and said he wanted 10l. for it, and if I would take that he would pay me for the clothes; I examined it - it was a double bottomed one, jewelled with rubies, half capped, stops and seconds - that is all I observed about it- I did not notice the maker's name, or number; I told him I did not exactly know the value, but would step to a neighbour, who was a watch-maker, and if it was worth the money I would do it, if he would wait the while: I went to Levy, and ascertained the value from him - he gave me 11l. for it; I left it with him - I returned, and told the prisoner I had got 10l.; I sold it to Levy, and told him a person was waiting at my house to sell it; he gave me two 5l. notes and a sovereign; I requested Levy to indorse the notes - he did so, in my presence; (looking at the 5l. note produced) this is one of them; he wrote his name in Hebrew - I know this to be one of the notes, for when I returned, at the prisoner's request, I indorsed the note with my own name; I know it to be the note I received from Levy, by the name on it in Hebrew, and I wrote my name and address on it; on my return home I presented one of the notes to the prisoner, and the other I was about to take the amount of clothing out of, when he said if I would give him the two notes he would pay me for the clothing; he did not do so, but produced another watch from his waistcoat pocket, and proposed that I should take that for the clothes; my suspicions were then rather raised - I opened the watch, and found it was a single case, gold dial plate, and doomed gold watch - I gave it back to him, and told him I would rather not do that: I had given him the two 5l. notes, and endorsed them with my name, at his request; I put the second watch into his hand - he said, in rather a hurry, "I will call again presently, and pay for the clothes," and went off in haste, leaving the clothes on the counter; he went off very quickly, and I heard no more of him till the officer called, and desired me to attend at Lambeth-street, where I saw him - that was a week after; Norris had called when I was out, and left word for me to come.

Cross-examined. Q. How far is your house from where you called on Levy? A. On the other side of the square - he then lived in Ship-alley; he lived there about three weeks - it is not above a minute's walk from Pell-street, about the length of this Court; the prisoner was an entire stranger to me - I never went by the name of Levy; I am a Christian, and of course should not take a Jew's name - I do not often deal in watches; the mates of ships are in the habit of exchanging watches for clothes when they are going to sea - silver watches, and so forth; it is seldom we have gold watches, we buy watches of them, and dispose of them to the trade.

Q. Do you always take 1l. out of 11l. for selling them? A. I was not going to give him 11l. when he only asked 10l.; I took 1l. myself - I consider that just.

Q. Did that justice ever bring you here before? A. I have been here several times; and I was tried here ten or eleven years ago for a thief, but not being a thief, I was honourably acquitted - that is the only time I was tried here; I was tried at Hicks's Hall, for a misdemeanor - I had sold some palms to somebody, who hung them at his door, and they were owned; I was tried for receiving them, but acquitted; it was six or seven years ago - nothing else of that sort has ever happened to me.

Q. Is this Hebrew all that Levy wrote? A. Yes, there is A. Levy, Pell-street, on it - he told the magistrate that he wrote it; I cannot recollect whether that was on it when he paid it to me. [Here the witness, by desire of the Learned Counsel, wrote his name on a slip of paper.]

Q. How soon did you give information about this? A. When Norris called, and asked me questions - I did not then know the prisoner's name.

Q. Did you take Norris to Levy? A. No, I did not see him myself - I have not seen the note; the prisoner got no clothes from me - I did not hear of the robbery till Norris left a message for me to come to the office.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you notice the prisoner's dress? A. He had a short blue jacket, speckled trousers, and a light waistcoat - he appeared to me to be a sort of inferior officer in the East India service.

JOHN NORRIS re-examined. When I took the prisoner, he wore a black waistcoat, with silver buttons, and a blue jacket; I went to search his lodging, and found the clothes, which had been described to me - that was the same night on which I took him, the 30th of July; I found a waistcoat, trousers, and an old pair of boots - he had the blue jacket on when I took him, and at the next examination he had the trousers and waistcoat on.

SAMUEL AVILA. My premises are in the parish of St. Dunstan, Stepney. On Wednesday, the 30th of July, I was from town; I returned next day - I have no partner.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

ABRAHAM LEVY . I lived in Pell-street, and afterwards See original in Ship-alley - I live there now; I went to live there between six and seven weeks ago - I know Howard Lewis - he stands there.

Q. Pray at any time in July, or thereabouts, had you any dealing with Howard Lewis? A. No, I never had dealings with him, he bears such a character; I never bought a gold watch of him for 11l.; I was asked that question before the Magistrate privately, and gave him the same account (looking at the note); this Hebrew is in my writing; the translation of it is "Abraham, the son of Joseph Levy;" and the English, "A. Levy, Pell-street," is my writing - I did not write that at the request of Lewis- I never had any dealings with him; I am a seller and dealer in jewellery and cutlery; I can repair a watch - I cause watches to be made; they are not made in my shop - there are seventeen different people employed to make a watch; I receive the parts from different people, and put them together.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Are you one of the seventeen who get your living by watches? A. I can take one to pieces; the Hebrew characters on the note are my writing - that note has been in my possession; I swear I did not give it to Lewis, for I never had dealings with him.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Does the Hebrew writing give you any information of the time the note left you? A. No; I cannot tell when I paid it away, but it must have gone out of my possession when I lived in Pell-street, as I always indorse them when I pay them away; I have not written Pell-street on a note since I have lived in Ship-alley; I turn in my business 150l. a month, or 200l.

JURY. Q. Are you sure that you never, through the medium of any person, had dealings with Howard Lewis? A. I am certain of it.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Were you ever in trouble yourself? A. No; my character stands unimpeached.

JURY to HOWARD LEWIS. Q. Do you know the person of Abraham Levy? A. Yes, perfectly well, for years; he is the person I sold the watch to; he contradicts me, but I gave sufficient proof to the Magistrate of my being correct - he said to me, "Come this way, Mr. Lewis, and I will pay you;" I thought he meant me to follow him - I followed him up stairs; he opened his bed-room door; he then saw me, and said, "I do not mean you to come here, I will come down to the shop to you;" I stated to the Magistrate that I saw in the bed-room what appeared a four-post bedstead, with new carved pillars; the officer was sent to see if it was correct.

JOHN NORRIS. I know an officer was sent there; he came back, and stated in the prisoner's presence, that LEWIS'S description was quite correct.

HOWARD LEWIS re-examined. I said I supposed it was a four-post bedstead, as I saw the posts at the feet, but could not see the head; when the officer returned, he said there were posts at the feet, but it had been turned into a tent bedstead.

Q. When the man refused the clothes, did you not feel disappointed? A. Rather so - he made off very quick, or I should certainly have gone after him; but I had nobody in my shop - I thought, by his producing a second watch, that he had not come honestly by it; I did not go to the office till Norris called, as I knew nothing of the robbery.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

Recommended to Mercy on account of his youth and character .

Thompson - James - Criminal Register
Thompson - James - Criminal Register

Note: Downloaded from ancestry.com.au.

Convict August 27, 1829 (Age 23)
Publication: Lesley Uebel, 2001, CD
Citation details: Convict Names
Publication: Lesley Uebel, 2001, CD
Citation details: The Transports
Note: Convicted to life for housebreaking. Departed on the Norfolk (2) from Spithead and arrived at the stated age of 24.
Note: The master of the "Norfolk" was Alexander Greig and the surgeon was James Dickson.
Ticket of Leave
Granted
before February 28, 1842 (Age 36)

Publication: Lesley Uebel, 2001, CD
Citation details: Marriages 1810 - 1851
Permission to Marry
By Rev G K Rusden
February 28, 1842 (Age 36)
Citation details: 16 November 2010
Thompson - James and Towers - Jane - Permission to marry.
Thompson - James and Towers - Jane - Permission to marry.

Note: Image kindly supplied by Rachael Hirst.

Publication: Lesley Uebel, 2001, CD
Citation details: Marriages 1810 - 1851
Thompson - James and Towers - Jane - Permission to marry.
Thompson - James and Towers - Jane - Permission to marry.

Note: Image kindly supplied by Rachael Hirst.

Religious marriageJane TOWERSView this family
March 22, 1842 (Age 36)
Address: Church of England
Citation details: V1842570 26C/1842 THOMPSON JAMES TOWERS JANE CT
Publication: Manning Wallamba Family History Society Inc; Taree, NSW;2004
Citation details: 1256
Citation details: 16 Novermber 2010
Thompson - James and Towers - Jane - Permission to marry.
Thompson - James and Towers - Jane - Permission to marry.

Note: Image kindly supplied by Rachael Hirst.

Marriage Certificate - Thompson - James and Towers - Jane
Marriage Certificate - Thompson - James and Towers - Jane

Note: Downloaded from ancestry.com.au.
Note: Image kindly provided by Mairi Campbell-White.

Birth of a son
#2
James THOMPSON
October 2, 1845 (Age 39)
Thomson - James - Baptism Certificate
Thomson - James - Baptism Certificate

Note: Image kindly provided by Rachael Hirst.

Citation details: V18453408 30A/1845 THOMSON JAMES JAMES JANE
Baptism of a sonJames THOMPSON
October 3, 1845 (Age 39)
Thomson - James - Baptism Certificate
Thomson - James - Baptism Certificate

Note: Image kindly provided by Rachael Hirst.

Thomson - James - Baptism Certificate
Thomson - James - Baptism Certificate

Note: Image kindly provided by Rachael Hirst.

Conditional Pardon
Second Class Conditional Pardon Granted No. 46/461
July 1, 1846 (Age 40)
Publication: Lesley Uebel, 2001, CD
Citation details: Conditional Pardons
Thompson - James - Conditional Pardon
Thompson - James - Conditional Pardon

Note: Downloaded from ancestry.com.au.

Birth of a son
#3
William THOMPSON
calculated 1847 (Age 41)

Birth of a daughter
#4
Elizabeth THOMPSON
calculated 1850 (Age 44)

Death Certificate - Atkins - Jane
Death Certificate - Atkins - Jane

Note: Downloaded from ancestry.com.au.
Note: Imagekindly made available by Mairi Campbell-White.

Birth of a son
#5
Henry George THOMPSON
calculated 1857 (Age 51)

Death Certificate - Atkins - Jane
Death Certificate - Atkins - Jane

Note: Downloaded from ancestry.com.au.
Note: Imagekindly made available by Mairi Campbell-White.

Death before August 25, 1866 (Age 60)

Marriage Certificate - Atkins - Joseph and Thompson - Jane
Marriage Certificate - Atkins - Joseph and Thompson - Jane

Note: Image kindly made available by Mairi Campbell-White.

Note: When Jane married Joseph Atkins it was noted that she was a widow.
Family with Jane TOWERS - View this family
himself
wife
Marriage: March 22, 1842Maitland, , New South Wales, Australia
4 years
son
2 years
son
4 years
daughter
daughter
son
Joseph Joshua ATKINS + Jane TOWERS - View this family
wife’s husband
wife
Marriage: August 25, 1866Bendolba, , New South Wales, Australia
16 months
step-daughter
Margaret A ATKINS
Birth: about 1867 53 40Dungog, , New South Wales, Australia
Death: February 13, 1868Dungog, , New South Wales, Australia
2 years
step-son
4 years
step-daughter
Isabella Jane ATKINS
Birth: about 1871 57 44Dungog, , New South Wales, Australia
Death: December 4, 1955Dungog, , New South Wales, Australia

BirthEmails - Rachael Hirst
Citation details: 16 November 2010
Thompson - James and Towers - Jane - Permission to marry.
Thompson - James and Towers - Jane - Permission to marry.

Note: Image kindly supplied by Rachael Hirst.

BirthThe Port Jackson Convicts Anthology
Publication: Lesley Uebel, 2001, CD
Citation details: Convict Names
BirthConvict Record - Thompson - James
Convict Record - Thompson - James
Convict Record - Thompson - James

Note: Downloaded from ancestry.com.au.

House BreakerWeb Site - Old Bailey - London's Central Criminal Court 1674 to 1913
ConvictionThe Port Jackson Convicts Anthology
Publication: Lesley Uebel, 2001, CD
Citation details: Convict Names
ConvictThe Port Jackson Convicts Anthology
Publication: Lesley Uebel, 2001, CD
Citation details: Convict Names
Ticket of LeaveThe Port Jackson Convicts Anthology
Publication: Lesley Uebel, 2001, CD
Citation details: Marriages 1810 - 1851
Permission to MarryEmails - Rachael Hirst
Citation details: 16 November 2010
Thompson - James and Towers - Jane - Permission to marry.
Thompson - James and Towers - Jane - Permission to marry.

Note: Image kindly supplied by Rachael Hirst.

MarriageMarriages registered in New South Wales.
Citation details: V1842570 26C/1842 THOMPSON JAMES TOWERS JANE CT
MarriagePre 1860 Pioneer Register - Book 2
Publication: Manning Wallamba Family History Society Inc; Taree, NSW;2004
Citation details: 1256
MarriageEmails - Rachael Hirst
Citation details: 16 Novermber 2010
Thompson - James and Towers - Jane - Permission to marry.
Thompson - James and Towers - Jane - Permission to marry.

Note: Image kindly supplied by Rachael Hirst.

MarriageMarriage Certificate - Thompson - James and Towers - Jane
Marriage Certificate - Thompson - James and Towers - Jane
Marriage Certificate - Thompson - James and Towers - Jane

Note: Downloaded from ancestry.com.au.
Note: Image kindly provided by Mairi Campbell-White.

Conditional PardonThe Port Jackson Convicts Anthology
Publication: Lesley Uebel, 2001, CD
Citation details: Conditional Pardons
DeathMarriage Certificate - Atkins - Joseph and Thompson - Jane
Marriage Certificate - Atkins - Joseph and Thompson - Jane
Marriage Certificate - Atkins - Joseph and Thompson - Jane

Note: Image kindly made available by Mairi Campbell-White.