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Elizabeth BEANAge: 9517821878

Name
Elizabeth BEAN
Given names
Elizabeth
Surname
BEAN
Married name
Elizabeth SHELLEY
Birth 31 December 1782 29 28

Baptism 10 February 1783 (Age 41 days)
Note: St. James Church
Birth of a brotherJames BEAN
5 May 1784 (Age 16 months)

Birth of a sisterRose BEAN
22 January 1786 (Age 3)

Birth of a brotherJames Thomas John BEAN
20 April 1788 (Age 5)

Death of a brotherJames BEAN
1788 (Age 5)

Birth of a sisterAnn BEAN
12 November 1789 (Age 6)
Publication: New South Wales Government
Citation details: V18541744 41A/1854 JAMES ANN AGE 64
Quality of data: secondary evidence
Christening of a sisterAnn BEAN
9 December 1789 (Age 6)
Address: St. John's Church of England Piccadilly
Birth of a brotherWilliam BEAN
8 September 1792 (Age 9)

Birth of a brotherJoseph BEAN
2 May 1794 (Age 11)

Birth of a sisterSarah BEAN
13 December 1795 (Age 12)

Emigration 10 January 1798 (Age 15)
Note: Terms of Settlement
Immigration 3 May 1799 (Age 16)
Note: James and his family sailed from England in 1798 on board "HMS Buffulo" and they arrivced in Sydney …
Religious marriageWilliam SHELLEYView this family
7 October 1801 (Age 18)
Address: St. John's Church of England
Marriage of a siblingSamuel JAMESAnn BEANView this family
Type: Religious marriage
28 November 1808 (Age 25)
Address: St. John's Church of England
Citation details: V1808422 147A/1808 JAMES SAMUEL BEAN ANN
Quality of data: primary evidence
Note: The ceremony was performed by James Milcham J.P. and the witnesses were Benjamin Jacobs and Ann Briant.
Death of a husbandWilliam SHELLEY
6 July 1815 (Age 32)
Burial of a husbandWilliam SHELLEY
after 6 July 1815 (Age 32)
Cemetery: St. John's Church of England
Death of a motherElizabeth ‘Betty’ TAYLOR
2 October 1818 (Age 35)
Death of a sisterRose BEAN
7 November 1831 (Age 48)

Death of a brotherWilliam BEAN
24 October 1834 (Age 51)

Death of a fatherJames Thomas John BEAN
19 April 1839 (Age 56)
Death of a sisterAnn BEAN
11 March 1854 (Age 71)
Citation details: V18541744 41A/1854 JAMES ANN AGE 64
Quality of data: secondary evidence
Burial of a sisterAnn BEAN
12 March 1854 (Age 71)
Cemetery: St. John's Church of England
Death of a brotherJames Thomas John BEAN
29 May 1859 (Age 76)

Death 20 September 1878 (Age 95)
Address: Macquarie Street
Text:

According to Elizabeth Bean's death certificate - she was 96 when she died at Parramatta. However, her maiden name in the death certificate is shown as Elizabeth Kirshaw, this is incorrect. Her father was James Thomas John Bean and mother Elizabeth Taylor. At the time of her death, she was survived by one son and one daughter. Three males and two females deceased. The informant for the death certificate was her son-in-law W. Mansfield.

In the Australian Index 1824-1842 Vol. 19 ML "SHELLEY, Elizabeth - Parramatta - Land Grant to issue. A., 23 -9- 1831" Same source - "SHELLEY, Elizabeth - Land Grant, Parramatta A., 13.4.1832." Same source - SHELLEY, Elizabeth - Subscriber to Parramatta Weslyan Chapel Fund - A., Aug, 4th 1837 p. 1" Same source - SHELLEY Mrs - Parramatta - Signs petition to Dr Sherwin. A., 26-8-1829"

Sydney Gazette 23 August, 1822 - " To the Editor of the Sydney Gazette - Sir, I trust my communication will not be deemed an intrusion either upon you columns, or your Readers. Something within me exists, as a prompter, to impel me before the Public - I have often looked upon the wretchedness of the poor New Hollander, and sighed for an alleviation of his distress. There now appears some prospect of good, according to the reply to Philanthropus. A certain paragraph in the communication constrained me to visit the Native Institution; and I was astonished, beyond measure, at the proficiency of the children under the tuition of the Governess, Mrs Shelley. The Institution did not contain more than twelve children. This diminutive numbers is the result of having married several of the females, who have been settled at Boongarruuby; and death has thinned their ranks. The few, however, that remain, bear ample testimony to two important facts: 1 - They have not made the proficiency to which they have attained without the most assiduous care of the Governess. From the little knowledge I possess of the blacks, I think myself competent to pronounce, with decision, on their character. They possess a vagrancy of mind that bears a strict analogy to their vagrancy of body. And those who have attempted merely to domesticate ONE black, and to make, him contented with a local habitation, will immediately perceive, how constant that application must have been on the part of the Governess, that has effected wonders, so extraordinary upon twelve. 2 - That these Aborigines posses powers of mind that may be greatly enlarged and improved. It is true that an excessive darkness seems to becloud their intellects, and apparently forbids the approach of intellectual light. But, it is very evident that this darkness is only apparent. I am fully convinced, that we have altogether erred in our estimation of the blacks, because we have inferred their total darkness, by comparing it with the effulgence of our own light. There is certainly a diversity in human minds, and much more may be expected from some of these natives, than from others. And as this same remark is applicable to the whole of the human family, does it not follow, if the tuition of the rising generation be perseveringly attended to, that we shall see from among these Natives, ornaments to political, moral and religious society. Much praise is due to Miss Shelley for the great attention she has paid to the female part of this little company. Nothing but seeing can prove a proper source of believing how much has been effected. If a company of Ladies and Gentlemen, would form themselves on a plan of paying regular visits to these children, doubtless their improvement would be greatly facilitated. There is no lack of persons in Parramatta of sufficient respectability to afford a little time for this purpose: and their little endeavors would produce great emulation in the minds of the children. This measure, in my judgment, would effect a change so mighty in the natives, generally, that they would send their children to the Institution, and the respectable Public would be insensibly drawn, to co-operate with All mighty God, in restoring to this moral image a people, the most degraded in the human family. Yours &c Aneradelphos.

Burial 23 September 1878 (3 days after death)
Cemetery: St. John's Church of England
Family with parents - View this family
father
mother
Marriage: 6 February 1780Piccadilly, Greater London, England, United Kingdom
3 years
herself
16 months
younger brother
21 months
younger sister
2 years
younger brother
19 months
younger sister
3 years
younger brother
20 months
younger brother
19 months
younger sister
Family with William SHELLEY - View this family
husband
William SHELLEY
Birth: 29 May 1774Hanley, Staffordshire, England, United Kingdom
Death: 6 July 1815Parramatta, , New South Wales, Australia
herself
Marriage: 7 October 1801Parramatta, , New South Wales, Australia

BirthWeb Site - Robert Mote - OziGen
BaptismWeb Site - Robert Mote - OziGen
EmigrationWeb Site - Robert Mote - OziGen
ImmigrationWeb Site - Robert Mote - OziGen
MarriageWeb Site - Robert Mote - OziGen
DeathWeb Site - Robert Mote - OziGen
Text:

According to Elizabeth Bean's death certificate - she was 96 when she died at Parramatta. However, her maiden name in the death certificate is shown as Elizabeth Kirshaw, this is incorrect. Her father was James Thomas John Bean and mother Elizabeth Taylor. At the time of her death, she was survived by one son and one daughter. Three males and two females deceased. The informant for the death certificate was her son-in-law W. Mansfield.

In the Australian Index 1824-1842 Vol. 19 ML "SHELLEY, Elizabeth - Parramatta - Land Grant to issue. A., 23 -9- 1831" Same source - "SHELLEY, Elizabeth - Land Grant, Parramatta A., 13.4.1832." Same source - SHELLEY, Elizabeth - Subscriber to Parramatta Weslyan Chapel Fund - A., Aug, 4th 1837 p. 1" Same source - SHELLEY Mrs - Parramatta - Signs petition to Dr Sherwin. A., 26-8-1829"

Sydney Gazette 23 August, 1822 - " To the Editor of the Sydney Gazette - Sir, I trust my communication will not be deemed an intrusion either upon you columns, or your Readers. Something within me exists, as a prompter, to impel me before the Public - I have often looked upon the wretchedness of the poor New Hollander, and sighed for an alleviation of his distress. There now appears some prospect of good, according to the reply to Philanthropus. A certain paragraph in the communication constrained me to visit the Native Institution; and I was astonished, beyond measure, at the proficiency of the children under the tuition of the Governess, Mrs Shelley. The Institution did not contain more than twelve children. This diminutive numbers is the result of having married several of the females, who have been settled at Boongarruuby; and death has thinned their ranks. The few, however, that remain, bear ample testimony to two important facts: 1 - They have not made the proficiency to which they have attained without the most assiduous care of the Governess. From the little knowledge I possess of the blacks, I think myself competent to pronounce, with decision, on their character. They possess a vagrancy of mind that bears a strict analogy to their vagrancy of body. And those who have attempted merely to domesticate ONE black, and to make, him contented with a local habitation, will immediately perceive, how constant that application must have been on the part of the Governess, that has effected wonders, so extraordinary upon twelve. 2 - That these Aborigines posses powers of mind that may be greatly enlarged and improved. It is true that an excessive darkness seems to becloud their intellects, and apparently forbids the approach of intellectual light. But, it is very evident that this darkness is only apparent. I am fully convinced, that we have altogether erred in our estimation of the blacks, because we have inferred their total darkness, by comparing it with the effulgence of our own light. There is certainly a diversity in human minds, and much more may be expected from some of these natives, than from others. And as this same remark is applicable to the whole of the human family, does it not follow, if the tuition of the rising generation be perseveringly attended to, that we shall see from among these Natives, ornaments to political, moral and religious society. Much praise is due to Miss Shelley for the great attention she has paid to the female part of this little company. Nothing but seeing can prove a proper source of believing how much has been effected. If a company of Ladies and Gentlemen, would form themselves on a plan of paying regular visits to these children, doubtless their improvement would be greatly facilitated. There is no lack of persons in Parramatta of sufficient respectability to afford a little time for this purpose: and their little endeavors would produce great emulation in the minds of the children. This measure, in my judgment, would effect a change so mighty in the natives, generally, that they would send their children to the Institution, and the respectable Public would be insensibly drawn, to co-operate with All mighty God, in restoring to this moral image a people, the most degraded in the human family. Yours &c Aneradelphos.

BurialWeb Site - Robert Mote - OziGen
SourceWeb Site - Robert Mote - OziGen